Mars soil and water want to kill you - Orbit 11.44


#1

We continue the round table format. Trying to tighten it up a bit but still make it conversational. This week we have Sarah Vincent, Michael Clark (in studio,) Benjamin Higginbotham, Cariann Higginbotham and Jared Head all leading the discussion. And of course YOU, the community of TMRO!

Launch Minute:

  • Soyuz | GLONASS
  • Soyuz | MetOp-C

Space News and Conversations:

  • Europa’s Plumes Are Confusingly Cold
  • New research into Mars’ perchlorates
  • Parker Solar Probe Completes Perihelion No. 1
  • Floods on Mars
  • SpaceX tests new recovery ship, spacesuits and simulators, and Elon teases mini-BFS

#2

Can perchlorates be used for O2? Russians say yes:


#3

Previously soil said to be ok for potatos

I’m thinking the black sands have hydrocarbons in. And the red sands have titanium oxide in. Curiosity should have the answer.


#4

Black sand could also be one of the states of iron oxidation: magnetite, Fe3O4.


#5

Old post all about perchlorates and how they would go about killing you:


#6

Coincidentally, there is a DLR-built greenhouse satellite going up on Nov 19th to grow tomatoes in lunar and martian gravity.

https://twitter.com/EuCROPIS


#7

Finally, an artificial gravity ship. It’s about 40 years overdue. This should be headline news.


#8

When we are talking about terraforming Mars we should keep in mind this research:
terraforming Mars
Unfortunately, processing all sources available on Mars would only increase the pressure to about 7% that of
Earth :slightly_frowning_face:
This research was supported in part by NASA through the MAVEN (Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution) spacecraft and Mars Odyssey THEMIS (Thermal Emission Imaging System) projects. Use data gathered from NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and Mars Odyssey spacecraft.


#9

7% is still good, It’s just above the Armstrong limit, which means you wouldn’t need a hard spacesuit to keep your body fluids from boiling. That’s a huge time and weight saver.


#10

Regarding US-China cooperation in space: I’ve read that there may actually be a chance that the government’s attitude might change. It’s due to the way congress elections turned out. The person mainly responsible for maintaining that provision (forbidding NASA from cooperating with China) lost re-election. So while there’s no guarantee, it’s possible that the provision may be removed at some point in the future.

NASA is always eager to cooperate with China, they just aren’t allowed to. If that provision ever goes, you can be sure that something will happen fairly quickly after that.